From Bally to Basement: using outcrops to unlock buried rocks

By: Stacey Evans For the last several years, Oklahoma has been experiencing an increased number of earthquakes. The most widely accepted hypothesis for the increase is the disposal of produced waste water from oil and gas wells into the Arbuckle Group, a porous geologic formation composed primarily of limestone and dolomite. I’m one of many…

Field (Camp) of Dreams

By Stacey Evans Gobble, Gobble.  Those words will forever remind me of my scariest moment during my first year teaching at the OU School of Geology & Geophysics’ Field Camp.  Similar formations at different stratigraphic intervals. Temperatures in the 90s.  Cholla1 .  Difficult structural problems. Rattlesnakes.  All of that pales in comparison to Gobble, Gobble.  Early…

Making ‘Wave’fields with IRIS

By Isaac Woelfel In May, I received an email about an IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) Research Wavefields Demonstration Community Experiment that was going to be conducted in Northern Oklahoma in the summer. Sounds like it’s going to be hot, I thought. Flash forward to Monday, June 20th with a high of 97 degrees…

Where’s the Node?!

By Noor Ghouse My coworker, Jen and I spent three days back in May assisting the USGS (United States Geological Survey) retrieve more than 1800 seismic array nodes deployed in Grant county for the LArge-n Seismic Survey in Oklahoma (LASSO). By 6:30 a.m., we’d be given our designated lines (north/south or east/west streets with node…

Deleted Scenes from the Salt Plains

By Ted Satterfield Even though I love being an editor, it can get pretty monotonous, which is why I love being an editor at the OGS. I occasionally get to leave the office, go outside and do something cool. Being able to spend a day digging for crystals in the Great Salt Plains is probably the…

The Making of a Field Trip: Planning and Logistics:

By David Brown This month, my colleagues and I spent time exploring routes for our upcoming field trip planned for later this fall. Such planning is important because the number and timing of field stops have to be coordinated so that everything flows smoothly on the day of the event. The idea is to spend…

Cold War and Peace

By Noor Ghouse I was overly eager when invited to join my colleagues on a trip to the Leonard Geophysical Observatory in early February. I was more than willing to help clean up and close up the old geophysical lab if it meant being able to see a piece of OGS history and what the…

A Rose Rock by Any Other Name

By Jennifer Morris “We’re going out to part of the Garber Formation to shoot some video and photos.” “Mmmmmhmmm,” I responded while half-diverting my attention to an email I was writing. He added, “We might have time to search for rose rocks…” “Oh yea?” My ears perked up. I stopped typing and looked up at…

Simpson Group – The Making of a Field Trip

By David Brown Note: This blog will record various activities related to the development of a new geology field trip, which is to coincide with a Fall 2016 workshop on the Simpson Group in Oklahoma.  The Simpson Group is a 400+ million-year-old sequence of rock formations that represents a period of important sedimentary deposition across…

Siting Seismic Stations

  By Isaac Woelfel There is a good chance if you live in rural northwest Oklahoma you have seen me this past week driving a white Chevy Silverado with the Oklahoma Geological Survey emblem. I might have even pulled into your driveway and knocked on your front door to inquire as to whether you, as…

From a Birdseye’s View

By Ted Satterfield I’m not a geologist. I’m an editor. I’m an editor at a geological survey, which means I occasionally get to climb out of my windowless office and do the coolest thing geologists do: Field Work. Well, they let me tag along. I got to spend two days traversing the landscape of south-central…